How To Unclog a Vacuum Hose

You might be using your vacuum cleaners nearly every day – and it’s a lot of work for these little machines.

From sucking out everyday dirt to accidentally sucking up large particles, paper clips, metal bolts and what not, we subject our cleaners to so much abuse all for keeping the house spick and span.

The fact of the matter is, a vacuum will diligently perform its duty as long as it’s taken care of and cleared out at regular intervals.

If subjected to any abuse by the user, the cleaner may clog and sorting that mess out will certainly cost you a lot of dough.

8 Steps To Unclog Your Vacuum The Right Way

So here’s a guide to unclog your vacuum that may stop performing its suction function due to blockages.

1) Switch on the vacuum: Turn your device on by pressing the switch and connecting the hose.

2) Inspect: Investigate if the suction is working or not. Carefully examine the vacuum.

3) Inspect the hose clearance area for any debris or unwanted substances that might be clogging the machine.

Remove the hose from the slot and hold it at an angle of 90 degrees from the floor. Twirl the lower part of the base in an upward direction and put a coin through this area.

If the coin passes through, there is no clog there. But if it doesn’t, you need a thin stick like a wire or hanger or a metal stick or something to move the clog towards the end of the hose.

4) Check canister for any obstruction:

You need to inspect the area where the vacuum connects to the debris bag. Put your hand in and try to feel the clog. Use the thin stick you employed to clean out the clog from the hose and twist and turn it to engage the clog.

5) Examine the Vacuum:

Check if the vacuum is working correctly by switching it on after following the above steps and if it doesn’t, you need to move further to these following steps.

6) Inspect the brush assembly area:

Disconnect the vacuum cleaner and look for clogs near the cover surrounding the brush assembly by using a screwdriver. Since you are required to turn over the vacuum for this, it’s better that you reposition the vacuum after you’re done.

7) Unclog the underlying areas:

Inspect the spot under the vacuum cleaner from the portal of entry of the debris. If there’s a clog, remove what you can reach with your fingers and for the inaccessible clogs use a wire or a hanger or any thin stick-like structure to engage it and move it out.

You can also use a thicker stick to move it up to the canister and then clear the bag.

8) Final Inspection:

Set the vacuum cleaner and plug the hose and all the brush assembly and attachments to examine if you’ve managed to unclog it. Switch it on and examine for suction by attempting to use it.

If the cleaner works, you have your mission accomplished. If not, please contact a repairman and get the cleaner fixed.

 

Buying the Right Type of Vacuum Cleaner

A lot depends on the type of vacuum cleaner you buy as well. For instance, hard floor vacuum cleaner is a better bet if you have a lot of cleaning to do. These vacuum cleaners come in two variations – canister and upright vacuum cleaners. Both have their pros and cons, and it depends on the user’s convenience.

A profitable investment would be in buying a vacuum cleaner which is specialized in the flooring type of your apartment and also which does well on carpets and area rugs. Before buying, look out for these features:

1. Non-marking wheels

You do not want scratches on your hard floor. So opt for non-marking wheels.

2. Check the head of the vacuum

Make sure the head of the vacuum doesn’t have thick bristle rotator brushes. Or else at least the vacuum cleaner needs to have the facility to switch on and off the rotator brushes. Using them would cause scratches on hard floors.

3. Adjustable suction power

For hard floors, a strong suction power is required. A profitable investment would mean having that adjustability to work on other floors and curtains too.